Camino & Resilience

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The route continued to Palas De Rei. After leaving Portomarin, crossing the River Mino we continued uphill steadily through woodland, the rain continued and got heavier and heavier. Continuing through small hamlets, passing the Hospital de la Cruz. Arriving at Vendas de Naron to get a ‘pilgrim stamp’ the old Romanesque Chapel, then continuing along the paved path, arriving at Sierra de Ligonde which offered fantastic views over the valleys. Particular parts of the route were isolated and quiet, apart from a rather large dog. The fog was dense and we were soaked through.

Approaching A Calzada the weather was so bad, we took shelter under a tree. There were other walkers, one an Australian man, we had met further back in other towns.  After discussing the weather, our blisters, stories of one walker getting frostbite back in the Pyrenees, our conversation compared the weather to life and the Camino, there are good and bad times, but we must press forwards.

The Camino de Santiago builds resilience, both emotionally and physically, it enables us to develop a positive mind and can-do-attitude.  We can integrate resilience into our lives on a daily basis, by being more active, getting more sleep and eating well, forgiving ourselves and resolving conflict. These small steps can help us improve our mental health and to face everyday challenges.

Camino Reunion

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Five female Camino walkers, from UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand met up in Sarria  April 4, 2018 for the Camino de Santiago, we all had maps, arrived by bus after a long journey and exchanged discussions about our travel and final destination.  We were all strangers in a foreign town. The following days these walkers became our constant companions, bumping into each other in a different foreign town, the Cathedral, Gatwick Airport, the same flight home.  We have kept in touch and are meeting up, to walk again on the Malvern Walking Festival, no doubt, a great scenic route and to ponder over the Camino experience and discuss another route for the Camino de Santiago next year.  Bueno Camino!

Adventure Education

 

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Adventure education is a type of experiential education, it is based on theories that individuals learn through direct experience rather than classroom based activities. Having walked with my daughter on the Camino de Santiago, it was apparent to see the many rewards of learning outdoors.  The Camino also develops skills of resilience as participants have to walk day after day, some carrying 8kg backpacks in all types of weather.  Adventure education focuses on self-esteem development, problem solving and effective communication skills.  Furthermore, learning to undertake risk management skills, making decisions, planning a daily route of walking and navigating offers increased participation, interaction, a sense of achievement and learning which is relevant and meaningful.